About the Artist

Tye Trevethick is an award-winning metal sculptor who has shown in multiple galleries and juried art shows across Northern California. His artwork stands apart.

Perhaps most notable is his unique mixture of dissimilar metals. His work integrates multiple different metals in one piece and fuses them into one seamless form. This skill to weld steel and stainless steel to one another lends to a style that evolves with time. As the years pass, the steel portions of the piece will oxidize while the stainless steel portions maintain their clean finish. In addition, copper and brass offer a rich focal point that can be maintained or let go to age with the rest of the piece, adding yet another dimension. This contrast of color and texture allows the artist to shade and highlight in the future. This means his pieces are forever giving and evolving.

“I take great pride in crafting each of my pieces with my own two hands and knowing that not only did its creation come from within me, but also that no two are exactly alike.”

The artist’s technique is like no other. Trevethick welds steel to stainless steel in a manner that can be finished to a level in which the two very different metals cannot be distinguished. This method is very tricky as stainless steel is a very hard metal that is difficult to bend and grind but melts at a much lower temperature than steel. Fusing the two evenly without warping is an art onto itself.

Trevethick also achieves rich colors on steel through special patinas: “One of the most diverse colors I enjoy using is a Japanese brown which requires the metal to be heated with application. This special patina allows me to achieve a wide range of colors from rich copper to black. I then seal the patina with specific metal oil and wax to richen the color and seal out moisture with a natural satin sheen.”

Trevethick’s designs convey a fluid sense of suspension and movement. He enjoys making a piece appear as though it is moving or falling despite the fact that it is still: “I feel a piece should exude a feeling to the viewer. Perhaps the piece reminds the viewer of a past experience or a future ambition, or maybe it empowers or calms the viewer. Whatever emotion it brings, I take solace in knowing it will forever touch that person.”

biopic

“Sculpture
is more than
a feeling — it is more than a thought, or an emotion.
It is a necessity
like water. It is a part of me and I am parched without it.”